Last edited by Mazujin
Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Old English dialects and the continental Germanic languages found in the catalog.

Old English dialects and the continental Germanic languages

Hans Frede Nielsen

Old English dialects and the continental Germanic languages

a survey of morphological and phonological interrelations

by Hans Frede Nielsen

  • 394 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Odense universitet, Laboratorium for folkesproglig middelalderlitteratur] in [Odense .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Dialects.,
  • English language -- Old English, ca. 450-1100 -- Foreign elements -- Germanic.,
  • Germanic languages -- History.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementHans Frede Nielsen.
    SeriesMindre skrifter udgivet af Laboratorium for folkesproglig middelalderlitteratur ved Odense universitet,, nr. 3
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPE287 .N53 1979
    The Physical Object
    Pagination40 p. ;
    Number of Pages40
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3525444M
    LC Control Number82110371

    Swedish (svenska [ˈsvɛ̂nːska] ()) is a North Germanic language spoken natively by 10 million people, predominantly in Sweden (as the sole official language) and in parts of Finland, where it has equal legal standing with is largely mutually intelligible with Norwegian and Danish, although the degree of mutual intelligibility is largely dependent on the dialect and accent of the. Old English is of course the most direct ancestor of the language we speak today, albeit one that has undergone a millennium of continuous change. Of the other languages in this book its closest relatives are Old Saxon and Old Frisian (below). It seems to have been introduced in .

    English and of Modern English, besides laying a secure foundation for the scientific study of any other Germanic tongue. NOTE.—The Germanic, or Teutonic, languages constitute a branch of the great Aryan, or Indo-Germanic (known also as the Indo-European) group. They are subdivided as follows: North Germanic: Scandinavian, or Norse. Old High.   On a semi-related note, in case you weren't aware, the initial "E" in continental Germanic languages (at least I think all of them) is pronounced like the English alphabet letter "A," like the sound in "may," "bay," "day," so England would have originally been pronounced like "Angle Land" (Land of the Angles) which is the origin of the name.   As time went on, Old English evolved further from the original Continental form, and regional dialects developed. Old English had four dialects –Northumbrian and Mercian, subdivisions of the dialects spoken by the Angles; West Saxon, a branch of the dialect spoken by the Saxons; and Kentish, originally the dialect spoken by the Jutes.

    All of those, and English too, are "Germanic" languages. Whatever exact language was spoken by the early German immigrants to England (let's call it "Germanic"), modern Germans would be no more able to understand it than they can English. If you don't believe me, pick up a copy of Beowulf (written in Old English) and see how easy it is to read. Old Saxon is the West Germanic language that was spoken by the continental Saxons in the early Medieval period until into the end of the 12th century. It is very closely related to other historical West Germanic languages such as Old English and Old Frisian. In Old Saxon, there are many dialects such as Westphalian, Eastphalian, Engerian, Essen. Old English and its Closest Relatives begins with an introduction to the comparative method in historical linguistics, using that with archaeology and history to provide an introduction to Indo-European and the Germanic languages. Then comes a general introduction to Germanic pronunciation and grammar. The core of the work consists of chapters on seven languages: Gothic, Old Norse, Old Saxon.


Share this book
You might also like
Thailands corporate financing and governance structures

Thailands corporate financing and governance structures

sunshine revolution

sunshine revolution

leaven of the word.

leaven of the word.

Research in economic and social history.

Research in economic and social history.

Lone pursuit

Lone pursuit

Ecological research at the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California

Ecological research at the Blacks Mountain Experimental Forest in northeastern California

Choke

Choke

Galilee, Jesus, and the Gospels

Galilee, Jesus, and the Gospels

No time for love

No time for love

Strategic Video Poker

Strategic Video Poker

The LGBT & modern family money manual

The LGBT & modern family money manual

The heroic image in five Shakespearean tragedies

The heroic image in five Shakespearean tragedies

Old English dialects and the continental Germanic languages by Hans Frede Nielsen Download PDF EPUB FB2

SyntaxTextGen not activatedGet this from a library! Old English and pdf closest relatives: a survey of the earliest Germanic languages. pdf W Robinson] -- At first glance, there may seem little reason to think of English and German as variant forms of a single language.

There are enormous differences between the two in pronunciation, vocabulary, and.The Journal download pdf Germanic Linguistics (JGL), published for the Society for Germanic Linguistics (SGL) and the Forum for the Society for Germanic Language Studies (FGLS), carries original articles, reviews, and notes on synchronic and diachronic issues pertaining to Germanic languages and dialects from the earliest phases to the present, including English (to ) and the extraterritorial varieties.Old English and the Continental Germanic languages.

A Survey of Morphological ebook Phonological Interrelations. Innsbruck: Institut für Sprachwissenschaft. (2nd edition ) Nielsen, Hans Frede. (). Ingwäonisch. In Heinrich Beck et al. (eds.), Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde (2.

Auflage), B – Berlin: De Gruyter.